Aspects of Play: Turbo Racing

As part of the module, the task was to look into the various types of games within the 3 specific bands of play. The band this game I shall be discussing ‘Turbo Racing’ belongs to is Internet Based.

TurbRac

When playing Turbo Racing, I found that it belonged to the following categories of play in relation to Roger Caillois’ theory of play; Mimicry, Alea and Agon

In terms of Mimicry, you control a racing car trying to win the a race. Agon comes from the nature of racing gameplay in the sense that it stems from being intrinsically competitive for the player desiring first place, or you will fail. Illinx doesn’t take presence within the game as it’s simply driving a car around the map, you could say that when you use the turbo boost on the car to go faster that it adds a slightly distorting effect to the screen but not enough to warrant the Illinx distinction. Alea takes the form of the other AI on the map that attempt to win the race as a way of providing competition for the player.

In terms of the elements in this game that I liked, I really liked the fact that as a Flash game, it provides a rather fluid and immersively distinctive racing simulator.

State of Flow, was it achieved?

Yes. I find that racing games promote and require an intense amount of focus to stay on track and not mess up, thus flow was induced primarily for the majority of each individual race I played in an attempt to win. I did find that when attaining first place, the challenge ceased to be of importance and flow began to dissipate, whereas chasing the lead tended to give more of a challenge and enforced flow.

If I were designing a game similar to this, I would implement a multiplayer aspect to it so that replayability is improved, because with racing games that are single-player you tend to find a lack of replayability on a track If you’ve already completed it. Whereas if you raced a friend on that track it wouldn’t matter because the goal is to win against your friend and not to beat the track.

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