Client Related Practice: Moving Objects in UDK

I haven’t as yet attempted to move anything within UDK as the people require a few tweaks in order for final hand-in so that they can go within the level. However, to prepare myself for the installation within UDK, I have found this tutorial that I will be using as reference for moving within UDK when the time comes to install it. It’s a very useful tutorial for those still confused by Kismet and how it works, and I look forward to potentially using it.

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Technical Production Skills: Kismet, Lighting & Other Things

For another tutorial, we had to create a level and then on a subsequent tutorial, use this level to add a Kismet element (Interactive elements, such as triggers) to the level to make a door open. Heres a couple of screenshots of the level (Note: I’ve tried multiple times to get a video recording of the level for better reference, even attempted doing it in GIF form, but my attempts at doing so have all failed. Screenshots will have to suffice until I find a workaround, i’m afraid). The first screenshot is the door of which its button is located to the left of it, (I was forced to use the mesh of a stone box because the mesh suggested in the tutorial was missing from the version of UDK I was using at the time). Second screenshot is the back wall, this comes from the post-tutorial were I simply went crazy with the lighting fixtures, and still I couldn’t get the back wall to light up, maybe next time.

Door1 Door4

Here is the said ‘button’ and for reference of the door opening, here’s the empty space it leaves. (Squint hard enough and you can see that I didn’t push the right door out far enough so you can see aspects of its mesh still)

Door2Door5

 

And the Kismet trigger from the editor.

Door3

I really did like this tutorial, the first real experience with UDK in an interactive sense with using Kismet, enjoyable and very useful for future projects.